Musical / artistic intelligence

iphone_mathThis type of intelligence has to do with sensitivity to sounds, rhythms and music. Students with high musical intelligence are able to sing, play musical instruments, and compose music, they are also able to think in rhythms and patterns, as well as to recognize these and manipulate them. They will sometimes use songs or rhythms to learn. They learn best through sounds, repetitive patterns or memory rhymes. Some may learn best via lecture or while listening to background music.

These students can prefer learning ideas by rote or by chanting, for example, in order to get the times table ‘by heart’. They listen and respond with interest to a variety of sounds: human voice, music, environmental sounds. They use vocabulary and notations of music, responds to music kinesthetically by conducting, performing, creating, dancing, recognize different musical styles, genres, develops a personal frame of reference for listening to music,  enjoy improvising and playing with sounds and have the ability to interpret meaning from music. They are holistic learners: the acquired material is a whole image or a complete episode; the component parts can only be retrieved by taking apart the complete episode and retrieving logical patterns between the items, where these exist.  Teachers can nurture this type of intelligence by integrating activities into their lessons that encourage students’ musical intelligence by playing music for the class and assigning tasks that involve students creating songs about the material being taught or creating a musical about an episode in the history of Math, playing background music for various activities and different moods in the classroom.

Maths Advent Calendar

Every date is connected to an audio file with a Maths question to be answered by the other students. The questions are stored on Soundcloud and can be heard by hovering the mouse over the Thinglink image. Click on the image to go to the Thinglink interface and hear our questions!

thinglink-calendar

FLIPPED LESSONS about mathematics

Using iPads, videocameras, or smartphones, the French, Romanian and Dutch students recorded  videos about a given topic. Students upload their video on the internet and share them using a Thinglink interface. All students in different countries watch the flipped lessons and have to answer a questionnaire about it. Click on the image below to get to the Thinglink page! The questionnare and answers can be seen on our eTwinning page.

thinglink-flipped

Here is an iPad created  video and below you can see one with paper

and one with Geogebra

Geometrical Self-portraits

Pupils created self-portraits using geometrical shapes or solids, by drawing, painting or using computer programs.

Video creation 

A video about a famous mathematician Stefan Banach, his love for math and not only. We can see the story  and inspiration to form one of his theorems, which was impossible to use in a real life and now it is known as a “ Banach- Tarski paradox”. It is not a real love story, but a very probable version.

Mondriaan Christmas Cards

In this activity students must create a card under certain rules. Doing this can create many differently coloured cards. The mathematical part in it is trying to get the lowest Mondriaan value.

Here is the activity:

And the solution:

Paintings by geogebra

Students create paintings on themes which they choose, using geometrical shapes and graphs by using geogebra and suitable computer program

paintings

Representing numbers

A video showing a calligraphy Project based on research done about how ancient cultures
represented numbers.

Funny riddles

Pupils search and record funny Maths riddles for their classmates to solve using their listening skills. Click  here to listen to them!

thing-it

Narrable. Maths in Art and Life

Students from the Comenius participating schools take photos during the visit in Matera to find Maths in art and life and a collaborative tool is chosen to show their contributions and their voices. Listen to them here!

narrable

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